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Golf Practice that will make golf swing changes stick / Balance Circuit

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Golf Practice Circuit to help a golfer learn better balance.

This video not only shows you WHAT drills will help you improve your balance and golf swing, but also explains HOW to practice these drills effectively.

Golf practice often leads golfers to be frustrated as the golf swing changes they are trying to make fail to show up on the golf course.

Team GLT have spent time putting together these practice circuits that can help golfers retain what they are learning on the golf range. How do they do this? The addition of Spacing, Variability and Challenge into your golf practice is proven to induce a deeper form of learning.

The spacing effect –

To forget is to remember. By incorporating the spacing effect to your training, you are effectively increasing the time you take between each rep. This creates cognitive stress as your brain – or more specifically, your working memory – is challenged to recall previous successful reps (more so than if there is little or no time between shots). So, rather than simply machine-gunning balls down the range, you are actively teaching your brain to induce a deeper degree of learning,

The variability effect –

Some significant neurobiological research from Stanford University has provided a bit of bad news for the way most people practice golf – namely, the evidence that suggests our brains crave variety.
In other, more golfy, terms – learning through repetition is, in most scenarios, ineffective. Instead, constantly changing the nature and application of tasks is vital for successfully learning and mastering any new movement – such as a golf swing – as this conscious variance is far better when it comes to engaging memory recall and creating cognitive stress.

The challenge point –

Increasing the spacing and variability in your practice will in turn increase the challenge point it presents. So, the more space and variability your training contains the higher the challenge point – and the more purposeful and rewarding that practice session has become.
Setting outcome goals is another way to elevate your own challenge point – with more complex and testing self-targeting representing a higher challenge point.

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